Art does not solve problems but makes us aware of their existence. It opens our eyes to see and our brain to imagine.
-- Magdalena Abakanowicz

 

   

The MONTHLY Motivator - January 2010

Choose To Enjoy

One of the quickest ways to improve your life is to decide that you are going to enjoy it. Enjoyment requires no complicated tools, no special training, and no expensive resources. In fact, enjoyment requires nothing more than your choice to allow it.

The rewards of that choice can be enormous. Think for a moment of the most genuinely and consistently successful person you know. Does that person nearly always seem to be enjoying what he or she is doing? Most likely the answer is yes. The fact is that those people who are the most spectacularly successful are the people who most fully enjoy what they are doing.

People who enjoy life are creative, productive, generous, compassionate, and contribute tremendously to the communities in which they live. They are enthusiastic about making a positive difference, and work diligently to do so. Where others see only gloom and doom, people who truly enjoy life see valuable positive opportunities. You can become one of those people right this very minute. As soon as you do, your life will begin to move in a more positive, successful direction.

Perhaps you think that there’s nothing enjoyable about your life right now. How, you wonder, can you enjoy life when there are the constant pressures of bills to be paid, health problems, difficult relationships and a world filled with negativity? The answer is simple and infinitely empowering.


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—Ralph Marston