Growth itself contains the germ of happiness.
-- Pearl S. Buck

 

   

The MONTHLY Motivator - November 2009

Paying the price

Would you expect to walk out of the supermarket with a basket full of fresh food, without paying for it? Would you expect to drive a new car away from the dealership, without paying for it? Of course not. For anything of value, there is a price to pay. There is always a price to pay. To be a great musician, or a winning athlete, you must pay the price with years and years of dedicated practice. To be successful in business, you must pay the price with innovation, risk taking, long hours and hard work.

For anything of value, there is a price that must be paid. Without the price, there is no value. It does no good to resent the price. Indeed, when you resent the fact that a price must be paid, you cut yourself off from the value of whatever you seek. Nothing has value for you unless you put value into it.

That may seem to be a very harsh reality, conspiring against you to deny you the best that life has to offer. Actually, though, it is the other way around. The fact that you must give value in order to experience value is what makes the good things in life possible. And just as importantly, it is this very dynamic that makes the good things in life, the very specific good things you desire, entirely accessible to you.

Paying the price gives you a dependable pathway to whatever you desire. For you do indeed have the ability to pay for anything you want. That ability comes from


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—Ralph Marston