Progress always involves risk; you can't steal second base and keep your foot on first.
-- Frederick Wilcox

 

   

The MONTHLY Motivator - June 2009

Fulfillment

There is nothing more that you need in order to be happy. There is nothing more that you need in order to experience complete fulfillment.

Fulfillment does not come after you get something. Fulfillment is the experience of living with purpose. You plan and strive in order to chase fulfillment, and yet much of that effort pushes real fulfillment away. You compromise your values, sacrificing what’s truly important in an effort to bring the things that you hope will bring fulfillment. But things do not bring fulfillment. Nothing brings fulfillment, because fulfillment is something you live from the inside out.

Fulfillment is the process itself. And you can enter into that process at any time. Fulfillment is not some separate thing that is apart from you. On the contrary, it is inside of you, ready to be experienced the moment you give your attention and awareness to it.

It may seem that if you reach a certain goal, or attain a desired level of success, the fulfillment you long for will be yours. That may very well be true, yet it is not the achievement that brings the fulfillment. It is the other way around. Living in a state of fulfillment is what enables achievement to take place. That’s a critical distinction, and understanding it can literally change your life.

There are many dreams, goals and aspirations you have for your life. Have you ever wondered where they come from? Have you ever asked yourself whether


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—Ralph Marston